6 Tips to Make Your Real Estate Blog: Final Blogging Installment

Principal Consultant , David Allison Inc.
  • May. 15, 2011

FINAL BLOGGING INSTALLMENT: SEE PREVIOUS POSTS HERE.

So you’ve got a real estate blog jam-packed with the kind of content that your prospects are going to find interesting. You’ve got them familiar with the voice and brand personality you want associated with your project, and you’ve introduced them to the initial offering and the surrounding neighbourhood. They’re intrigued. Now you need to keep them engaged. And that comes down to more than just the content of the blog itself.

1. Get factual

Say-nothing writing about “redefining luxury” doesn’t help build trust or confidence. It’s counterproductive. Instead, provide your readers with hard, real irrefutable facts. Try posting links to competitive resale homes in MLS, for example. This kind of boldness projects confidence in your project, and is seen as an act of good faith. Which creates a whole new level of loyalty.

2. Answer possible buyer objections

At Braun/Allison, we’ve used blog titles like “For that money, I could get a house”. When you speak directly to the objections that people will have about a project, it demonstrates that you see things from the buyer’s perspective.

3. Provide relevant, targeted information

When you’re selling a community that’s targeted toward 50-somethings, it makes no sense to talk about bars, clubs and extreme mountain biking. Remember who you are selling to, and provide content that’s relevant for them. Make their lives better.

4. Use twitter to promote your blog posts

Using Twitter for real estate is a topic unto itself. But of course, your Twitter account could, and should, be used to announce new blog posts to your network of followers. It’s all about connectivity.

5. Video is engaging

It’s easier to watch videos than to read long stories online, plain and simple. In the new social media landscape, the more human and personal it is the more it engenders trust. Also, some stories just lend themselves better to video footage. Video updates on construction progress, or interviews with the developer, the architect and the neighbours, for example.

6. Be ready for comments

Blogs should allow for feedback and questions to be posted in an open forum. Remember, consumers are looking for dialogue and engagement, not a one-way conversation. Use objections and negative feedback as an opportunity to explain yourself. If one person takes the time to send you comments from out in left field, there are others who are just as confused. It’s worth responding and explaining. (Blog comments can be moderated by an approval process, so any that are truly inappropriate can be deleted.)

I’m looking forward to seeing what you come up with! If you’ve got a great blog going for your real estate project, send me a message and maybe we’ll write about it here? A good blog is worth sharing, after all.


David Allison works with executive teams in real estate development and other industries to craft the early-stage vision and brand for projects of all kinds. He crystallizes the most interesting…

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David Allison works with executive teams in real estate development and other industries to craft the early-stage vision and brand for projects of all kinds. He crystallizes the most interesting…

Read more





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