Property Biz Canada

TOBY winner profile: Cloverdale Mall in Toronto


Toronto’s Cloverdale Mall marked its 60th anniversary this year and also celebrated a Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) of Canada TOBY Award for best retail building at BOMEX 2017 in Toronto in September.

The Cloverdale Mall in Toronto.

The Cloverdale Mall in Toronto. (Image courtesy Bentall Kennedy)

“Since 2009, we have continuously held a Platinum BOMA BEST certification, which is the most prestigious designation available through the program,” said Anne Vit, retail services general manager for Bentall Kennedy, which manages the British Columbia Investment Management Corporation-owned property. “Only 12 other Canadian centres currently hold this designation.

“Over the past three years, we are proud to have reduced our electricity consumption by 13.3 per cent and natural gas consumption by 27.7 per cent. Notable energy conservation measures include the annual purchase of green electricity, the use of renewable energy through our wind turbines and retrofitting all of our parking lot lighting to LED fixtures.”

Cloverdale has 378,359 square feet of leasable space and 1,917 outdoor parking stalls. Two wind turbines in the parking lot generate power for three parking lot lighting posts and the entrance signage.

The first enclosed shopping centre in the region has more than 85 stores and services, provides jobs for more than 1,000 people and welcomes 4.6 million visitors annually. It has received several awards and certifications over the years from BOMA and other organizations for its environmental, sustainability and marketing initiatives.

Other Cloverdale environmental initiatives

“We pride ourselves in being leaders in the industry and contributing to the corporate vision by maintaining the high standards that our clients have come to expect of our services,” said Vit.

Cloverdale collects rainwater in an 1,136-litre cistern, which is used for its interior and exterior planters, to conserve potable water. The cistern also functions as a stormwater management enhancement by reducing the strain on storm sewers. Native trees, shrubs and flowers are planted throughout the site.

Cloverdale has a waste diversion rate of 80.7 per cent, which greatly exceeds the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change’s 60 per cent target rate. Its programs include an annual community electronic waste drive and repurposing coffee grounds into potting soil.

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Cloverdale holds a one-day community electronic waste disposal drive for Earth Week every year and diverted 3,980 pounds of electronic waste from landfill this year.

Cloverdale received the TOBY Award for more than its environmental and sustainability initiatives, however.

Community engagement at Cloverdale

The centre is a Toy Mountain drop-off location and last year it donated 1,390 toys to less fortunate children in the community.

Cloverdale Mall provides retailers and charitable organizations with a complimentary community boardroom for group meetings, events and training. It also has a community kiosk that offers free space to non-profit and charitable organizations to help them raise funds and awareness.

Cloverdale has hosted a monthly antique market since 2008 and has held a government and community services fair every February for more than 10 years to educate community residents on what services are available.

Doors at the mall, located in the city’s Etobicoke region, open at 6 a.m. to allow 200 registered members a quiet and climate-controlled environment in which to walk.

“Community engagement is the foundation of Cloverdale’s success, and it’s our responsibility to ensure the continuance of servicing the community and staying true to what the shopping centre means to our customers,” said Vit.

Tenant communication is important

Cloverdale has an in-house monthly marketing newsletter to inform merchants of upcoming events and promotions. It also delivers quarterly newsletters to tenants to increase occupant awareness of sustainability issues.

Management holds quarterly breakfast meetings to discuss tenant matters and retail trends and to obtain feedback to better serve their needs.

“Communication is extremely important with all staff, all departments and our tenants to ensure efficient operation of the shopping centre,” said Vit.

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Steve McLean

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Steve is a veteran writer, reporter, editor and communications specialist whose work has appeared in a wide variety of print and online outlets. He’s the author of the book Hot Canadian Bands and has taught reporting to college students. He is based in Toronto.

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